Personal Training

Personal Training

 

The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe to match your nature with Nature. ~ Joseph Campbell

The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe to match your nature with Nature. ~ Joseph Campbell

Maximize your time and energy to be the best you can be!
I am dedicated to offer you an exceptional personal training program that will help you achieve a higher level of health and fitness. The benefits that you may enjoy include increased energy levels, improved posture, weight loss, reduced joint stiffness, increased core strength, sport-specific conditioning, better stamina, and an improved sense of well being. I specialize in private and partner training programs, offered in hour or half-hour sessions. Most clients choose to work out with me for 1-3 training sessions a week. We typically meet at the Wood River YMCA in Ketchum, Idaho. If you prefer to work out at home, your program will be designed to meet your needs. In most cases, if equipment is recommended, the cost will be relatively inexpensive.

Partner Training

Partner training is an affordable way to have personalized training and split the cost. Couples particularly enjoy the time interacting and encouraging their spouses, while having fun and working hard.

Small Group Training

Small group training keeps you engaged and moving. Clients enjoy the group dynamics and want to continue taking their training to the next level under the guidance of a personal coach. Three or four people split the cost.

 How Do We Start?

I ask you to fill out a physical readiness questionnaire, called a PAR-Q. This is a standard form that, depending on your answers, tells you whether or not you need to check with your doctor before you start or continue with your exercise program. Along with this, I ask you to fill out a health and lifestyle questionnaire that gives me more specific information about you, so that our first meeting together doesn’t waste any time.training

Your first session is critical to helping you set up a foundation for success. I do some assessments to see where your strengths and weaknesses are. Assessing body composition, cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility helps identify your current health, facilitates setting personal goals, and establishes a baseline from which progress can be measured. I include functional movement screens, core assessment, posture and joint range of motion assessments. Although the first session does involve this necessary screening, you will get some exercises in! After the first several training sessions, you will definitely get the ‘flow” of a great workout!

How much does it cost?

The fees for training vary according to the length of the session (30, or 60 minutes), as well as how often you would like to train. As well, different price structures exist for small group training (2-4 people). I will be happy to discuss fees with you. Sessions are pre-paid, either cash or check.

What do we do?
Unless you have specific concerns/goals, a well- rounded program needs to include the following:

  • Overall strength: I like exercises that incorporate full body movement, because in life and sports, we need to move well. It gives you better results overall.
  • Core Training : Your midsection provides the foundation for a stable center of gravity, which helps support your spine, enhance your posture, and prevent certain muscle-related injuries. (Essential Core / Copyright ) Having a strong core is crucial.
  • Balance and Coordination: You will get this automatically in your workouts because you won’t be using a lot of machines.
  • Flexibility: If you train with me, you will eventually be doing yoga! I incorporate specific flexibility, if necessary, throughout your workout.
  • Cardiovascular endurance: To be a regular exerciser, you have to find time in your schedule on an ongoing basis. We will incorporate the activities that you enjoy into your program, and help you become more aware of the opportunities to move more in your daily life.

 My Policies

I do require  24 hours’ notice when canceling an appointment.

Stretching out after a great TRX Suspension trainer workout

Stretching out after a great TRX Suspension trainer workout

photo

 

Recent Posts

Say goodbye to sore muscles with foam rolling and a tennis ball

Rolling, or myofacial release is a simple therapy to help you stretch and get rid of knots in your muscles.

Should you be foam rolling?  If you’ve never noticed or heard of them, they are 3- foot long white or colored foam rolls, typically in gyms near the stretching area. And if you also noticed tennis balls being used by trainers and regulars, you might want to give them a try. Rolling, or myofacial release is a simple therapy to help you stretch and get rid of knots in your muscles. It relieves and releases adhesions within the fascia. Akin to massage and trigger -point therapy, the manual pressure of rolling rejuvenates hard working muscles and soft tissue. If your muscles hurt after a hard day of skiing, or have overuse patterns, myofascia-release helps stretch, increase blood blow and increase range of motion to muscle.

Fascia is the connective tissue that covers all muscle. Injury, inactivity, disease or inflammation contributes to a loss of elasticity, resulting in unwanted fibrous adhesions. In other words, tight, sore muscles. Physiotherapists or massage therapists typically spend about 45 percent of their time doing massage therapy on these areas to stretch tight muscles and fascia, loosen scar tissue, and relieve muscle spasms. The good news is that in as little as two minutes, foam or tennis ball rolling can enhance joint range of motion, which is important for healthy movement, particularly if you never stretch. 

1. First you roll 

Starting your training or competition with foam rolling helps get your muscles warmed up, as it improves your range of motion. Unlike static stretching at the beginning of a workout, which research shows can diminishes performance, foam rolling doesn’t have any drawbacks. In a recent study participants improved their range of motion significantly after foam rolling compared to static and dynamic stretching.

Begin by applying sustained pressure on a roller or ball with your body weight. You can roll any muscle, but hip flexors, hamstrings, calves, quadriceps, and the upper back are typically the tightest areas. Use your own body weight in varying positions. The sustained pressure helps isolate soft tissue areas and release fascial adhesions, similar to a deep massage. What’s more is that the friction between the fascia and the foam roller warms the fascia, making it more fluid and elastic. 

2. Stretch and strengthen afterwards

After spending a few minutes rolling, it is important to actively stretch the area you just rolled. Let’s say that you just finished rolling your calf muscle, because it’s tight from skiing. Getting up from the ground and performing a standing calf stretch will further stretch the muscles you just rolled, bringing it back to it’s resting length. Doing so, you’ve just helped fixed shortened, tight muscles into lengthened proper functioning muscles. The final step in a well-rounded corrective protocol would be to do some calf exercises, like standing heel raises, to strengthen all the calf muscles. 

3. Don’t run for the shower yet 

You might also consider using a roller or tennis ball after demanding exercise. All that hard work creates muscle damage. Recent studies showed participants improved range of motion in the knee joint and hips compared to control groups.

And lastly, there is evidence that foam rolling can also help you reduce fatigue post-exercise and possibly improve long-term performance.

Click on link to see tennis ball rolling –

As seen in

https://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/features/fitness-guru/article_8835b3e8-5f0a-11ea-936a-e7ba628a730c.html

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