Personal Training

Personal Training

 

The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe to match your nature with Nature. ~ Joseph Campbell

The goal of life is to make your heartbeat match the beat of the universe to match your nature with Nature. ~ Joseph Campbell

Maximize your time and energy to be the best you can be!
I am dedicated to offer you an exceptional personal training program that will help you achieve a higher level of health and fitness. The benefits that you may enjoy include increased energy levels, improved posture, weight loss, reduced joint stiffness, increased core strength, sport-specific conditioning, better stamina, and an improved sense of well being. I specialize in private and partner training programs, offered in hour or half-hour sessions. Most clients choose to work out with me for 1-3 training sessions a week. We typically meet at the Wood River YMCA in Ketchum, Idaho. If you prefer to work out at home, your program will be designed to meet your needs. In most cases, if equipment is recommended, the cost will be relatively inexpensive.

Partner Training

Partner training is an affordable way to have personalized training and split the cost. Couples particularly enjoy the time interacting and encouraging their spouses, while having fun and working hard.

Small Group Training

Small group training keeps you engaged and moving. Clients enjoy the group dynamics and want to continue taking their training to the next level under the guidance of a personal coach. Three or four people split the cost.

 How Do We Start?

I ask you to fill out a physical readiness questionnaire, called a PAR-Q. This is a standard form that, depending on your answers, tells you whether or not you need to check with your doctor before you start or continue with your exercise program. Along with this, I ask you to fill out a health and lifestyle questionnaire that gives me more specific information about you, so that our first meeting together doesn’t waste any time.training

Your first session is critical to helping you set up a foundation for success. I do some assessments to see where your strengths and weaknesses are. Assessing body composition, cardio-respiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, and flexibility helps identify your current health, facilitates setting personal goals, and establishes a baseline from which progress can be measured. I include functional movement screens, core assessment, posture and joint range of motion assessments. Although the first session does involve this necessary screening, you will get some exercises in! After the first several training sessions, you will definitely get the ‘flow” of a great workout!

How much does it cost?

The fees for training vary according to the length of the session (30, or 60 minutes), as well as how often you would like to train. As well, different price structures exist for small group training (2-4 people). I will be happy to discuss fees with you. Sessions are pre-paid, either cash or check.

What do we do?
Unless you have specific concerns/goals, a well- rounded program needs to include the following:

  • Overall strength: I like exercises that incorporate full body movement, because in life and sports, we need to move well. It gives you better results overall.
  • Core Training : Your midsection provides the foundation for a stable center of gravity, which helps support your spine, enhance your posture, and prevent certain muscle-related injuries. (Essential Core / Copyright ) Having a strong core is crucial.
  • Balance and Coordination: You will get this automatically in your workouts because you won’t be using a lot of machines.
  • Flexibility: If you train with me, you will eventually be doing yoga! I incorporate specific flexibility, if necessary, throughout your workout.
  • Cardiovascular endurance: To be a regular exerciser, you have to find time in your schedule on an ongoing basis. We will incorporate the activities that you enjoy into your program, and help you become more aware of the opportunities to move more in your daily life.

 My Policies

I do require  24 hours’ notice when canceling an appointment.

Stretching out after a great TRX Suspension trainer workout

Stretching out after a great TRX Suspension trainer workout

photo

 

Recent Posts

Five essential exercises for ski training

It’s not too late to build the strength and stamina needed to hit the slopes

 

Preparation plays an important role in athletics. And now that it’s not long before the mountain opens; it’s not too late to build the strength, endurance and power needed for the demands of skiing, and decrease the risk for injury. Here are five key training tips to start off the ski season prepared, and excited for a new season.

1. Get out the door.

When it comes to having a great day on the hill, a strong cardiovascular base will make your time on the mountain fun, rather than being out of breathe and exhausted. Head out to local trails, for both steep short climbs and longer hikes, or if pressed for time, indoor cardio equipment. Try to do cardio workouts 3-5 each week, for 20-45 minutes.

2. Knee control

Squats and lunges strengthen all the muscles that stabilize and support your knees. But to do them right, you want to train the correct hip and knee angles. If you have knee cave when your bend your knees  (i.e.; your knee falls in) for example, it typically means that the gluteal medius muscles (middle butt) are weak. Single leg squats, using a band above the knee, strengthen the glutes and hips, while stabilizing the knee. This will help you improve your coordination of the whole movement and translates to better skiing. 

3.Tempo for tough legs 

Strengthening the quads and hamstrings is paramountto carving great ski turns. Front squats make your legs stronger, as these train primarily “concentric “ strength-the strength it takes to press out of the bottom of the squat. Keep doing them, as they are great. When it comes to alpine skiing though, gravity helps you down the hill. From a strength perspective, your legs first fight gravity from being forced into the hill, and then pop up, into the next turn. Adding “ eccentric” training, like “squat jumps “and “skater’s hops “ mimic ski turns. 

Eccentric is the action of a muscle lengthening: for example, remember a time hiking down a mountain that made you sore, not the hike up the mountain. In squat jumps, land, and slow down your deceleration, (about 2-3 seconds) to train eccentric leg strength. 

 

4.Dynamic balance 

Skiing is dynamic. You tip a ski (or board) onto its edge, balance your weight over that edge, and then the ski turns. Like magic. When you are skiing well, you look relaxed, fluid, and in balance. Dynamic balance also helps you react to changing snow and light. To train balance, stand on one foot for one minute, writing the alphabet with small movements of the free foot and ankle. Progress the move to standing on a BOSU,  (a half- ball) or a square of foam. 

5.Intra-abdominal pressure; your core 

A strong core makes it easier for your whole body to move together when you are carving a nice round turn. The core muscles splint the entire trunk and torso. In PT speak, the core is known as the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex, and is actually 29 pairs of muscles. All of these muscles work together; the abs, hips, and lower back, to transmit and generate force between the lower and upper body.  Practice planks, with your forearms underneath your shoulders. Staying straight from your head to your heels, lift one leg upward, and hold for 2 seconds. Alternate lifting one leg at a time, for 35 seconds.

Click on link to view exercises athttps://vimeo.com/365178195

https://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/features/fitness-guru/article_1ef45404-eb7c-11e9-8ecd-2f3e568fe60a.html

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