About Me

I learned to love the journey, not the destination.I learned that this is not a dress rehearsal, and that today is the only guarantee you get.-Anna Quindlen Credit: SQNSport

I learned to love the journey, not the destination.I learned that this is not a dress rehearsal, and that today is the only guarantee you get.-Anna Quindlen
Credit: SQNSport

About Me

 

I have been coaching and helping people improve their fitness since 1986. My passion is to help you become stronger for activities you love, or to simply tone up. My job is to make sure that your time training with me is effective and fun, using cutting edge programming.

Although I work with top-level athletes in the sports-oriented town of Sun Valley, I also know from experience the challenges we face when rebounding from injuries, surgeries or chronic conditions.  As a former junior ski racer, I have a passion for skiing. I also love to run, hike, bike and rock climb, taking me to the cliffs of the Greek Islands, Sardinia, Italy, Spain and Thailand. But in 2004 I was struck with spondylolisthesis, a painful slipped disc in my lower back. I was living with chronic pain. After undergoing surgery to fix my back I began focusing my education on the limbo-pelvic-hip complex, and how to manage and prevent back pain. I am back to doing the things I love.

Since 2000 I have also studied yoga with world-renowned yoga teachers, so if you train with me, you will surely do some yoga. Balance is huge for people over 40. So is the necessity of bringing together muscles and mind to move more efficiently, to relax when we need to relax, and to be powerful when power is needed. For example, have you ever noticed that a great skier’s upper body is always relaxed?

We will begin with a 7-page health history questionnaire. Before we hit the gym I want to know where your body has been, and where you want it to go. We will train for full body moves with high metabolic cost. Whether your goal is fat loss, training for a specific athletic achievement, or returning to your favorite sport, I will bring abundant enthusiasm and the best programming to design your workout. ( If you train with me I can guarantee you that you will not be sore on the first day of ski season.)

Here is a list of my credentials:

  • American College of Sports Medicine ( ACSM ) Certified Exercise Physiologist 
  • American Council on Exercise (gold level)
  • Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research
  • Active Isolated Strengthening Therapist (a method of fascia release used to facilitate stretching)
  • Connie is an International Dance Exercise Association Elite Level Personal Trainer  ( the highest level of achievement in the personal fitness training industry)
  • TRX Suspension training coach.
  • Author of the Essential Core Poster
  • Author of a popular monthly health and fitness column for the Idaho Mountain Express
  • Voted one of the top fitness trainers in the Sun Valley area
  • Yoga training with www.judithlasater.com, www.seanecorn.com, and www.erich schiffman.com
  • YMCA Group Exercise Leader

 

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Recent Posts

Good posture is relaxed, not forced

Image

Wouldn’t it be nice if our posture was always perfect, vertical and symmetrically balanced? Yet as in life, it’s never that way. When it comes to our posture, many of us tilt, shift, slump, and bend, and it can feel like an uphill battle against the gravitational field of the earth. Yet if your goal is to improve your posture and have a healthy spine, we want to continually practice healthy movement habits. We all have some imbalances, and old habits. Tensing your shoulders, holding your breath, or a forward head are counterproductive not only in weight training, but in any sport.  Tomas Myer in his book Anatomy Trains, writes that everyone has a story, and good stories always involve some imbalance.

Good posture is relaxed, not forced.

Good posture is an easy upright alignment, where the body weights of your head, chest, and pelvis are poised one atop the other, like a stack of colorful wooden building blocks. The spine’s “ home-base” is it’s natural neutral position, where it is in the least stressed position.


The ease of good posture allows for its’ three natural curves; the neck, or cervical spine, the mid-back, or thoracic spine, and the low back, or lumbar spine. Standing or sitting up straight allows for the presence of each of these three natural curves. Beyond looking symmetrical though, there are copious muscles and connective tissue webbing working to support the spine. It isn’t a freestanding pillar, writes Dr. Stuart McGill, Professor Emeritus at the University of Waterloo and author ofBackMechanic.  Instead, he says, think of it more like a radio tower, a tall metallic structure stabilized by guy-wires that are connected to the ground.  The guy-wires act in the same way that the network of muscles and ligaments that surround our spinal columns do, providing strength and support.

Reminding yourself to pull your shoulders back is only part of the posture picture. Alignment is dynamic, neurologically adaptive, and certainly has an emotional component. Finding out where your muscle tension lives, your neck, for example, is helpful to find that particular pattern that causes the trouble in the first place. It’s known by the “ everything-connects-to-everything-else principle. “ It helps to understand which muscles are shortened or tight, or which emotions might be contributing to that feeling, and how that affects the whole body. 

Using imagery to improve spinal alignment

Using imagery can help you experience an incredible release of muscle tension. The Franklin Method uses imagery metaphorically, and is helpful if you are unfamiliar with anatomy. Here are some images from Eric Franklin’s book Dynamic AlignmentThrough Imagery, to try to help improve your spinal alignment. You just might discover a very fixable imbalance.

Lighting designer aligns the spine (lying, sitting, or standing):

1.Visualize the spine as a chain of spotlights. Turn on all the lights and observe their focal directions. If they shine in many confused directions, adjust them so that they all focus in the sagittal plane. Now adjust them so that they shine with equal brightness.

Head on geyser

2. Imagine your central axis to be a waterspout or geyser. Your head floats effortlessly on top of this column. Visualize your shoulders and your body as the water falls back down to the ground. Allow your head to bob on the top of the column of water. As the geyser become stronger, your head is buoyed upward. Let the power of the water increase the height of your head.


https://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/features/fitness-guru/article_aa648d9e-5188-11e9-9360-1381d385e740.html

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