About Me

I learned to love the journey, not the destination.I learned that this is not a dress rehearsal, and that today is the only guarantee you get.-Anna Quindlen Credit: SQNSport

I learned to love the journey, not the destination.I learned that this is not a dress rehearsal, and that today is the only guarantee you get.-Anna Quindlen
Credit: SQNSport

About Me

 

I have been coaching and helping people improve their fitness since 1986. My passion is to help you become stronger for activities you love, or to simply tone up. My job is to make sure that your time training with me is effective and fun, using cutting edge programming.

Although I work with top-level athletes in the sports-oriented town of Sun Valley, I also know from experience the challenges we face when rebounding from injuries, surgeries or chronic conditions.  As a former junior ski racer, I have a passion for skiing. I also love to run, hike, bike and rock climb, taking me to the cliffs of the Greek Islands, Sardinia, Italy, Spain and Thailand. But in 2004 I was struck with spondylolisthesis, a painful slipped disc in my lower back. I was living with chronic pain. After undergoing surgery to fix my back I began focusing my education on the limbo-pelvic-hip complex, and how to manage and prevent back pain. I am back to doing the things I love.

Since 2000 I have also studied yoga with world-renowned yoga teachers, so if you train with me, you will surely do some yoga. Balance is huge for people over 40. So is the necessity of bringing together muscles and mind to move more efficiently, to relax when we need to relax, and to be powerful when power is needed. For example, have you ever noticed that a great skier’s upper body is always relaxed?

We will begin with a 7-page health history questionnaire. Before we hit the gym I want to know where your body has been, and where you want it to go. We will train for full body moves with high metabolic cost. Whether your goal is fat loss, training for a specific athletic achievement, or returning to your favorite sport, I will bring abundant enthusiasm and the best programming to design your workout. ( If you train with me I can guarantee you that you will not be sore on the first day of ski season.)

Here is a list of my credentials:

  • American College of Sports Medicine ( ACSM ) Certified Exercise Physiologist 
  • American Council on Exercise (gold level)
  • Cooper Institute for Aerobics Research
  • Active Isolated Strengthening Therapist (a method of fascia release used to facilitate stretching)
  • Connie is an International Dance Exercise Association Elite Level Personal Trainer  ( the highest level of achievement in the personal fitness training industry)
  • TRX Suspension training coach.
  • Author of the Essential Core Poster
  • Author of a popular monthly health and fitness column for the Idaho Mountain Express
  • Voted one of the top fitness trainers in the Sun Valley area
  • Yoga training with www.judithlasater.com, www.seanecorn.com, and www.erich schiffman.com
  • YMCA Group Exercise Leader

 

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Recent Posts

6 Tips on Happiness and Health

Would you really want to live forever if you can’t have any fun doing it? You’ve heard it a million times: Health is happiness.

Would you really want to live forever if you can’t have any fun doing it? You’ve heard it a million times: Health is happiness. Health correlates more strongly with happiness than any other variable. After all, the connection between living longer and the meaning and purpose of life has been recognized since Aristotle. Fast forward to today: What if, along with eating your Brussels sprouts or exercising, you found ways to laugh every day?

If you’re facing a serious illness, or are in pain, certainly it’s difficult to feel happy, and anyone would hope for you to have the best outcome. But any amount of positive emotions, like happiness, has health benefits. With the demands and stresses of the holidays approaching, here are 6 facts on happiness that might inspire you.


1. You are less likely to die

People who report that they feel a larger sense of well-being are less likely to die compared to those who do not. Of course it can be difficult to differentiate between causes and effects, but there are good research studies to show at least a correlation between the two.


2. Happiness is protective

It would be nice if a happiness intervention stopped all illness, but this field is relatively new. However, it can contribute in a smaller way. Happiness is associated with less risk of a stroke, diabetes, high blood pressure and arthritis. There is also some evidence that people with serious health conditions such as coronary artery disease, spinal cord injury and heart failure are more likely to recover more quickly when they feel happy.


3. Positive emotions strengthen resilience

A study of 175 Belgian adults, ages 40-65, who underwent blood tests for three inflammation markers found that the participants who experienced a broader range of positive emotions had lower levels of inflammation compared to those who experienced fewer positive emotions. You can put this into practice by noticing when you are experiencing a positive emotion and tag it. Tagging, or labeling it can help you experience more positive emotions throughout the rest of the day.


4. Be mindful

The effects of happiness based on positive psychology have been widely examined. An overview of more than 100 trials involving people with cancer, cardiovascular disease or other conditions showed that mindfulness improved depression, anxiety and stress compared with control conditions. And several studies of mindfulness for patients with chronic pain can help lessen distress and coping skills.


5. Move more

Do you remember, when you were young, Mom telling you to go outside and play? The behavior that has been studied most extensively regarding happiness is physical activity. The link between depression and physical inactivity has been recognized for many years.


6. Giving to appreciate our shared humanity

Doing something nice for someone changes the activity in your brain in ways that increase feelings of happiness. We are hard-wired to give. In a recent experiment, toddlers given goldfish, which researchers knew they adored, were twice as happy when they gave them away to a puppet named Monkey. For many of us though, it seems overwhelming, that your small donation can’t possibly make a difference. Being able to envision how your money will be spent does.


Connie Aronson is an ACSM-certified exercise physiologist at the YMCA in Ketchum. Learn more at www.conniearonson.com.

https://www.mtexpress.com/wood_river_journal/features/fitness-guru/article_5b001b86-1791-11ea-825b-ef55b4dcf33c.html ( excuse lack of edit! )

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